Book Traveling Thursdays: A Wrinkle in Time

Book Traveling Thursday is a book meme that involves book covers from different parts of the world. Rules include picking a book according to the theme and then posting the original covers, covers from your country, your favorite covers, and your least favorite covers. This week, the theme is in commemoration of Johnny Appleseed: “Show us your favorite kids, or middle-grade book. ”

Hands down going to be Madeleine L’Engle, duh. A Wrinkle in Time took me to many places and gave me the love of science and math that I’ve carried even today. So of course I was going to highlight this!

That said, because this book was published in the ’60s and is a classic, there are a LOT of book covers. Seriously, trying to list down just the US covers was ridiculous. So I’ve limited it to the ones I liked of the US covers and threw in a few foreign covers to boot.

The Original

I will say it’s a pretty cool original cover, though this wasn’t the version I first read from.

Fun fact, THIS was.

Which, to be honest, I thought was cool because I saw Meg Murry and thought: “OH GOD. THAT’S ME.” I mean, nowadays I don’t think I’m much of a Meg Murry, but she’s still an awesome character.

US Covers

These were pretty awesome covers from the US. The second set is what I own, since it came as a boxed set of loveliness.

Favorite Cover

This was such a pretty collection of covers! I love the look of this, though granted, it doesn’t showcase the children that the book is about.

Least Favorite Covers

These two are…actually scary. The first is a Finnish version with characters that look nothing like the Murrys and Calvin. Charles Wallace isn’t exactly a derpy-looking kid. The second is a Turkish edition, which, from afar looks pretty cool, but then you take a closer look and the photo in the bubble is a stark and unwelcome contrast to the childlike illustration around it.

Other Foreign Covers

I also wanted to showcase some of the other foreign covers, because some of them are pretty nifty. It’s interesting to see what they focus on for each cover. My favorite of these is the simple Spanish cover, because it legit shows the wrinkle in time that Mrs. Whatsit passes.

What do you think of these covers? Do you have a favorite?

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Mini Reviews: All the Light We Cannot See, Waking Gods

In truth, I could probably have written much more about both these books that could garner full reviews, but I’m pressed for time and you really don’t want me ranting about Waking Gods anyway, right? Okay, maybe you might (I rant rather rantily), but the timing issue pretty much screws things up.

Anyway, both of these were audiobooks I’d listened to in the span of a few days. They were pretty addicting, and All the Light We Cannot See was surprisingly fantastic, even though again, I would say that I probably should have taken a reviewer’s advise and stopped at around page 477. The ending…well, ended in a hopeful note much like The Book Thief did, but I found it anticlimactic and honestly, by that point, I thought the story just went on for too long.

As for Waking Gods, well. Maybe I should have read the book and not listened to the audio. The audiobook pissed me off because there were so many ingratiatingly annoying voices added into the mix, most of it being mother-effing Eva. This is supposed to be a scared 10- or 11-year-old girl but sounded like a whiny 40-year-old instead. I don’t know if I could listen to the third book knowing that Eva will be back, because holy crap, I cringed and wanted to chuck my phone out the window every single time she came into the scene (and unfortunately she becomes main in the last half hour of the damn audiobook). I’m hoping there’s a change in the voice actress in any case, though I highly doubt it, considering they’ve remained pretty consistent on both books so far.

Have you read either of these books? What did you think?

Mini Reviews: Xena Warrior Princess, Battlestar Galactica

I may have seen someone review the Xena graphic novel and my initial thought was: “THEY MADE A XENA GRAPHIC NOVEL?!” So naturally I needed it in my life. And I was glad that I did. That also meant that I got wind of the fact that Dynamite Entertainment also had a Battlestar Galactica one, so I had to go and read the first volume of that, too.

Wasn’t such a big fan of the BSG one, but the Xena graphic novel was a hoot and a half.

Have you read either of these? What did you think?

Words and Wordsmiths || The List Review

Initial Thoughts:

This seems to be leading up to an overall big picture story, which means sequels. Yay. (Make note I also groaned.) It was a simple, middle grade read about a dystopia pulling from Biblical and Bradburyan (that’s totally a word now…) inspiration, and I did love the concept of a wordsmith collecting and protecting words.


THE LIST

by Patricia Forde
Sourcebooks Jabberwocky, August 2017
Children’s science fiction, dystopian
Rated: 3.5 / 5 cookies
provided by NetGalley

In the city of Ark, speech is constrained to five hundred sanctioned words. Speak outside the approved lexicon and face banishment. The exceptions are the Wordsmith and his apprentice Letta, the keepers and archivists of all language in their post-apocalyptic, neo-medieval world.

On the death of her master, Letta is suddenly promoted to Wordsmith, charged with collecting and saving words. But when she uncovers a sinister plan to suppress language and rob Ark’s citizens of their power of speech, she realizes that it’s up to her to save not only words, but culture itself.

The Word According to Noa

I think at some point people compared this book to a children’s version of 1984 and The Giver. Okay, it sort of is, and I sort of see it. I thought the better analogy might have been Fahrenheit 451 meets The Bible and they both walk into a bar called 1984. Though for children.

Erm.

In the end, the comparisons are all really just trying to say that the world is screwed up, and instead of making it better, some jerk at the top makes things much worse, and the poor people at the bottom have to make do or rise up.

Which is really how the book starts. As readers, we are introduced to Letta, an apprentice wordsmith in Ark. As wordsmiths, Benjamin and Letta are tasked locating and storing words from the outside world. Their main directive, however, is to provide words to the people of Ark, though provision is allowed to only a sanction of 500 words. List-speak is the appropriate form of conversation between people, and with 500 meager words, you can only imagine how that is going to turn out. I mean, abstract ideas don’t even come into play here. I don’t think could survive this world…

Freedom. Music. Feelings. Were they things they could live without?

So yeah, how does Letta, a wordsmith–or better yet, anyone–survive without words, with only just a List?

The book itself is a quick read and follows a story after the events of an ecological disaster. There’s a lot of worldbuilding involved, with inspiration being pulled from the Bible of all places. The Melting–which sounds like the worst-case scenario of global warming–has caused the world to overflood, destroying buildings and cities like nobody’s business. Amidst this disaster comes John Noa, who builds a city called Ark (like the Biblical story of Noah’s Ark, if you didn’t pick up on it already), and saves many inhabitants from the apocalyptic disaster. He does, however, impose unreasonable rules for living in the area. And, throughout the story, it is clear how much he hates words (even though he likes speaking them, the hypocrite).

It’s easy to see where this is going, and as a children’s book, you expect it to go in the direction it does. Letta is a girl who grows up in the shadow of Ark, and does not question John Noa’s rules until her mentor goes missing. From there, she meet cutes a rebel artist/musician/Desecrator boy (which is kind of adorable, heh) and nurses him to a point where he owes a great debt to her. Then she meets a couple other hippie Desecrators and suddenly she is finding that the world is so much more than the safety and wordlessness of Ark.

She had been in awe of John Noa before, looked up to him as the man who had saved the planet. She had grown up on stories of his great valor, his clever thinking, his vision. Now she knew that none of that was real. John Noa was a bully. That thought made her brave. He might be a very clever bully, but he was still a bully.

So she rebels, too.

From what I read, the book seems to gear itself to a sequel, though one can read this as a standalone if you’re okay with how things are resolved (which, come to think of it, I’m not. Not really). There’s still the matter of Letta’s parentage as well as the question of what happens to Ark. There’s still a lot of words to be found and collected and shared. There’s still a lot of obnoxious gavvers that need boots up their rear ends–hem hem. And then of course there’s also the matter of Marlo. But I suppose that’s another story for another day.

3.5 out of 5 cookies! It was a good, fun read, and definitely a welcome one amidst my pile of YA literature, haha.


Have you read this book? What did you think?

Pirates, Mermaids, Monsters, Oh My! || Monstress, Vol. 2 Review

Initial Thoughts: 

Can this get any more EPIC? The answer is YES. There are pirates and animalistic Arcanics (THERE’S A SHARK GIRL WHAT) and old gods that eerily remind me of Alucard’s crazy demon form in Hellsing. And lawd, when’s the next set coming out because MORE PLS.


MONSTRESS, VOL. 2: THE BLOOD

by Marjorie M. Liu, Sana Takeda (illustrator)
Image Comics, July 2017
Graphic novel, science fiction, fantasy, steampunk
Rated: 5 / 5 cookies

The Eisner-nominated MONSTRESS is back! Maika, Kippa, and Ren journey to Thyria in search of answers to her past… and discover a new, terrible, threat. Collects MONSTRESS #7-12.

I don’t think I’ve fallen so hard and so fast over a comics series than I had with Monstress, and honestly, it’s largely to do with the two amazing women who’ve brought this story to life on the illustrated medium. Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda are mistresses of their craft, and together they managed to convey a wonderful story of a powerful girl in a world still reeling from the previous war and yet gearing for a new one.

The story follows after Volume 1 (Issues 1-6) and picks up the pace, sending Maika, Kippa, and Ren south to Thyria, Maika’s hometown. There, Maika regroups and enlists the help of pirates to ferry her further south, to the Cape of Bones, a place where Moriko Halfwolf had once traveled. To gain more information of the monster inside her, Maika follows her mother’s footsteps–and obsession with the legendary Shaman Princess–south, encountering dangers along the way, as well as a deeper understanding of how to control the Monstrum within.

As can normally be found in most first volumes, the first six issues of Monstress dealt with throwing as much information our way as possible. While Liu and Takeda managed to convey the information in creative ways (including a little professor-student talking panel every issue for the heavier worldbuilding aspects), most of the first volume was truly introductory. Yes, the second volume also deals with the addition of new characters, but by this point, we are familiar with a bit of the world and there’s less explaining to do. So for the most part, we can sit back and enjoy the story.

Well, sort of.

Then Liu comes around and throws us for a loop and we start to devour the next bits of fantastical element thrown our way. In this case, the sea Arcanics.

Yes, we saw the awesomeness of the Fox Queen and the Monkey King and by that point we are unsurprised by the group of “nekomancers” littering the pages (I mean, Ren is one of them…). But a motherfrelling Arcanic shark? Mermaids and sirens and bone-chilling sea creatures of doom? Hell yes!

Not to mention dapper ex-pirate lions and tigers, who, by the way, are friggin’ AWESOME.

I don’t know how they’re not super-hot in those outfits, I would be if I was sporting that much fur in my body. That said, CAN I GET THEIR CLOTHES? I’d so wear the shmat out of them.

And, because we needed more badass females, throw in a female captain in the mix.

Of course, the issues don’t just deal with Maika’s story, though hers takes center stage for the most part. Characters introduced in the previous issues–such as the Cumaea and the Dawn and Dusk Courts–recur in the next several issues, and while Maika’s journey is largely one of self-discovery, we have several other characters mobilized to find her. Chief among them is the Sword of the East, who is revealed to be Maika’s sole living relative, an aunt who had been unaware of her presence. The Cumaea is still after Maika’s Monstrum, while others seek to destroy her.

It’s no wonder Maika broods all the time. Shes’ got a shitton of people coming after her, and to add cherry to her fantastic life, the ravenous monster inside her is getting stronger and stronger, almost to the brink of being out of control.

And yet, she still has that sass that made me love her in the beginning issues.

The second volume is chock-full of action, and more of the story is revealed to the reader, including a back story of the old gods that used to live in the known world. If you thought the first volume was epic, the second one blows it out of the water. Hem hem.

And honestly, those issue cover illustrations.

I cannot gush enough about this volume of Monstress. I highly recommend it, for story, for female badassery, for a world that’s a mix of everything I love about fantasy/scifi worldbuilding. Now I feel like the Monstrum, because this series is making me insatiable. I want more please!

5 out of 5 cookies!

This counts as #11 of the Graphic Novels/Manga Reading Challenge and #4 of the Steampunk Reading Challenge.


Have you read this series? What did you think?