TTT: Book Quotes

For more information on Top Ten Tuesday, click here.

I have done quote-related Top Ten Tuesdays before, but I specified them mostly through Terry Pratchett quotes and swoon-worthy quotes. So this time I’ll actually do my Goodreads favorites! I’ve been trying to save quotes up from books I absolutely adored, but it’s much harder to do when you get so invested in a book that you forget to take pictures or make note of what quote you really loved. Also, Goodreads doesn’t always have the one particular quote I want from a particular scene from a particular book…but I’ll make do.

I also limited quotes to one from each author, because then I might end up just doing a V.E. Schwab special or something…wait. That’s not an entirely bad idea…I’m going to save that for another quotes-related TTT!

Top Ten Book Quotes a la Goodreads

“Captain?”

“Yeah?”

“Do you think it was destiny that brought us together?”

He squinted and, after a thoughtful moment, shook his head. “No. I’m pretty sure it was Cinder.”

Cress by Marissa Meyer

There’s a lot of quotes that made me die a bit in Marissa Meyer’s Lunar Chronicles series, and this one wasn’t half as funny, but it’s so. damn. true. I blame Cinder for everything. And I love her for it.

Elend smiled. “Oh, come on. You have to admit that you’re unusual, Vin. You’re like some strange mixture of a noblewoman, a street urchin, and a cat. Plus, you’ve managed–in our short three years together–to kill not only my god, but my father, my brother, and my fiancee. That’s kind of like a homicidal hat trick.”

The Hero of Ages by Brandon Sanderson

Elend is just full of snazzy things to say about awesome Vin.

Richard did not believe in angels, he never had. He was damned if he was going to start now. Still, it was much easier not to believe in something when it was not actually looking directly at you and saying your name.

Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman

No list of quotes would be complete without a Gaiman quote. Honestly, it was between this and one from American Gods, but the AG one would have meant the use of profane things.

“I’ve looked at the world for quite a few years now and I’ve found that if I don’t laugh, I’ll probably end up crying.”

Demon Lord of Karanda by David Eddings

Silk is the bees’ knees! Again, there were plenty more fun things he’s said in the Belgariad, but this one has a grain of truth that still resonates with me. I laugh to prevent myself from crying over the world, too, Kheldar.

The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don’t.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Galaxy by Douglas Adams

Which brings me to this gem of a Douglas Adams quote. ‘Nuff said. I could do a special on his sayings, too.

Does the walker choose the path, or the path the walker?

Sabriel by Garth Nix

Definitely another quote that’s stayed with me for years on end.

The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!

Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen

Pretty much the modern version of this is: “Fictional men have given me high expectations in romance!” True dat.

Once upon a time, the sky knew the weight of angel armies on the move, and the wind blew infernal with the fire of their wings.

Days of Blood and Starlight by Laini Taylor

I love all of Laini Taylor’s “Once upon a time” openers in her Daughter of Smoke and Bone series. This one was just extra poetic, which was beautiful.

“So you would have me throw Shazi to the wolves?”

“Shazi?” Jalal’s grin widened. “Honestly, I pity the wolves.”

The Wrath and the Dawn by Renee Ahdieh

Honestly, I’m surprised I didn’t use any of the other quotes I adored in Wrath, but I really liked this one.

“Things are or they are not, Vasya,” he interrupted. “If you want something, it means you do not have it, it means that you do not believe it is there, which means it will never be there. The fire is or it is not. That which you call magic is simply not allowing the world to be other than as you will it.”

The Girl in the Tower by Katherine Arden

Magic is so much clearer now! Seriously, though, Morozko you old frost demon, you.

Was there a book quote that stayed with you for a while?

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Literature and London Part 1: A Darker Shade of London Magic

I’ve been meaning to write this post since I’d gotten back from vacation in April, and somehow time got away with me. Or, shall I say, I ran away from time due to other time-sensitive (hah!)…stuff. In any case, I wanted to do a more geeky, in-depth post about my very short time in London (and its surrounding areas). And, of course, because I’m a book-nerd, I was going to do so with a bookish twist, much like what I did with my Prague post!

“There’s Dull London, Kell London, Creepy London, and Dead London.” – A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab

Unlike Prague, it’s got a bit more of an assortment of literary fandoms, only because many books I’ve read encompass various parts of the United Kingdom, and not just that of the city itself. Since I knew the Shades of Magic and Harry Potter references would run a bit long, I decided to split my London and Literature series of blog posts into three parts.

And, of course, Schwab won out as the first post. Because why the hell not?!

Windsor’s distance from London was terribly inconvenient considering the fact that, when traveling between worlds, Kell could only move between a place in one and the same exact place in another. Which was a problem because there was no Windsor Castle a day’s journey from Red London. In fact, Kell had just come through the stone wall of a courtyard belonging to a wealthy gentleman in a town called Disan. Disan was, on the whole, a very pleasant place.

Windsor was not.

Impressive, to be sure. But not pleasant. – A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab

I knew there was quite a bit of description of certain places in Grey London in A Darker Shade of Magic, but rereading it definitely reopened my eyes to just how much of Grey London had been largely described. I find it a bit appropriate that when I visited Windsor, it was kind of a grayish day, much like when Kell walked into the castle to see George III. I wouldn’t go so far as to say Windsor wasn’t a pleasant place, the town itself had a sort of charm, even in lieu of us crazy tourists and our need to look at the inside of The Queen’s favorite residence.

He continued on until the park gave way to the streets of London, and then the looming form of Westminster. Kell had a fondness for the abbey, and he nodded to it, as if to an old friend. Despite the city’s soot and dirt, its clutter and its poor, it had something Red London lacked: a resistance to change. An appreciation for the enduring, and the effort it took to make something so…here, Westminster Abbey always stood, waiting to greet him. – A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab

I felt sort of like Kell, though unlike him, I traveled through the Underground to get to Westminster. When I walked up the stairs and out of the underground, Westminster pretty much greeted me in its staunch regalness and unchanging glory. It was a lovely sight to walk into, and I can’t help grow a fondness for such a structure amidst the hustle and bustle of the city streets.

Even at night, the river shone red.

As Kell stepped from the bank of one London onto the bank of another, the black slick of the Thames was replaced by the warm, steady glow of the Isle. It glittered like a jewel, lit from within, a ribbon of constant light unraveling through Red London. A source.

A vein of power. An artery. – A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab

I pretty much walked parallel to the Thames for an entire day, and I often glanced at it and wondered how the city would have looked if the water was really red. Alas, no magic in this artery. The view, however, is particularly pretty, and I’d like to think that in another time and another London, a tavern boat called the Sea King moored its ports. (Up until it burns down, of course…bad Lila!)

Also, on a similar note, Red London’s version of the Thames is the Isle, a glittering red river running across Red London with power. At the heart of it stands a palace, the House of Maresh, and honestly, if it had a Grey London equivalent, I’d imagine it to be exactly like Tower Bridge, which is certainly a magnificent structure that straddles the river. Wouldn’t it be cool if that was how the palace looked like? It probably doesn’t, but my imagination ran away with me, so…

Lila was soaked to the bone.

Halfway across the bridge, the sky had finally opened up–not a drizzle, as London often seemed to favor, but a downpour. Within moments, they had been soaked through. It certainly didn’t make dragging the half-conscious Kell any easier. – A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab

And somewhere in the distance–probably at London Bridge (which isn’t Millennium Bridge OR Tower Bridge, but the plain one in between)–in another time and another London, is a crossdressing girl thief dragging a half-conscious ginger-headed Antari across the river and into the Stone’s Throw.

On a related note, skim-reading ADSOM was a good and terribly bad idea. Good because holy hell, HOW did I totally forget about a fake-Kell striptease happening in the middle of the book?! And bad because OMG lots of other things happened and then I ended up spending hours just reading scenes upon scenes of my favorite characters and and…hours later this post still wasn’t written. Yeah.

Pity there wasn’t a Stone’s Throw in sight, but I will say that I dined in a pub near the bridge, which comes a bit close!

Coming up in the next London and Literature post: Hogwarts and Harry Potter.

3 Quotes Book Tag – Day 3

Day 3 of quotes tag! Okay, it’s much harder to pick from the quotes I love than it seems. I have so much saved! Anyway, thanks to Confessions of a Literary Addict for the tag!

The Rules

  1. Thank the person who nominated you.
  2. Post a quote for 3 consecutive days (1 quote for each day).
  3. Nominate three new bloggers each day.

The Quote

alicequote (3)

Sense and Sensibility is not my favorite Austen book, but this quote makes me laugh all the time. Especially when it can be joined with this particular gif:

It’s just still so frelling relevant. Change the wording and Austen is talking my language.

The Tags

La Foi Aveugle

Susanne Valenti

The Night Girl

3 Quotes Book Tag – Day 2

Day 2 of quotes tag! Okay, it’s much harder to pick from the quotes I love than it seems. I have so much saved! Anyway, thanks to Confessions of a Literary Addict for the tag!

The Rules

  1. Thank the person who nominated you.
  2. Post a quote for 3 consecutive days (1 quote for each day).
  3. Nominate three new bloggers each day.

The Quote

mistbornquote

I think this is where Elend won me over entirely. I wasn’t such a big fan, to be honest, because I never saw him as a particularly interesting character. Even his friends seemed more intriguing, with their radical ideas and philosophical talk. Still, Elend is one of my favorite characters ever, and mostly because he’s the type of bookworm I can relate to. I’ve often found myself losing track of time when books are involved, so this conversation between a late Elend and an incredulous Breeze made me chortle much in the book.

The Tags

Don’t Shush Me!

Magic of Books

Forwards and Bookwords

3 Quotes Book Tag – Day 1

I swear I mean to post more taggish memes (even the ones that I wasn’t tagged in but find interesting), but I always seem to want to push them off at later dates up until I forget about them. Oops? In my defense, I’m not so late with this one!

Much thanks to Confessions of a Literary Addict for the tag! Although now I have to actually think up of book quotes I like, lol,

The Rules

  1. Thank the person who nominated you.
  2. Post a quote for 3 consecutive days (1 quote for each day).
  3. Nominate three new bloggers each day.

The Quote

alicequote

The book is absolutely quotable from top to bottom, though my favorite sayings have always been when the Mad Hatter engages Alice in a bit of wordplay. There’s something reminiscent of mathematical logic in this particular quote (which makes sense, considering the author was very proficient in mathematics), and for me, it’s still one of the best literary-rendered explanations of conditionals that I’ve ever seen. I mean what I say.

The Tags

Chachic’s Book Nook

The World According to Life

Aria Stuck in Wonderland